Lending Club Update 9/17/18

Hope everyone is doing well, I’ve been getting some questions about lending club here lately with how much I’ve been talking about it and posting about it. Hopefully today I can answer all those questions and give you an update on where I am at with this investing platform.

In case you weren’t around when I first talked about this, I started using lending club in April of 2017. Lending club is a peer to peer lending and borrowing platform. Where individual investors fund individual borrowers for various loans. These loans can range quite a bit in size from $4,000 to $35,000 or so, 36 months or 60 months in length, and of various ratings and interest rates. Now I’m not going all in on $30k loans or anything like that, I’m not rolling that deep by any stretch of the imagination. The loans are bought in notes from an investor perspective, these notes are in $25 increments. Now you could go and fund an entire loan yourself I like to diversify, and I currently fund over 200 different loans over the course of a year and a half.  Much like a car payment or a house payment the borrower pays the loan off every month so as an investor you get paid out every month in principal and interest. Of course, the house takes a cut as well and that’s generally around 1-2% depending on the loan. The rate on the loans are usually between 5%-30% interest rates based on the borrower’s credit score, previous lines of credit, income etc. etc. Obviously the higher the interest rate the higher the risk of defaulting the loan, and the lower the interest rate the less likely the borrower is to default. Below is a quick snapshot of how my portfolio looks in terms of active notes, defaults, late notes, and fully paid notes.

lending club notes

Now generally I take a rather aggressive approach to my notes and my average interest rate is around 15-18% overall. That can explain some of the defaults I’ve had as they are a higher risk loan, per usual with investing the greater the risk the greater the reward.

What really turned me on to Lending Club and this platform of investing (peer to peer lending) is the monthly payments. Dividend stocks are great, and I have quite a bit of cash flow from them (currently $275/year as we speak) however only a few of them pay me monthly. Having a monthly cash flow allows me to compound my gains 4x faster than a quarterly dividend stock which most of them are quarterly. I also am more fluid with withdrawing money with this platform which leads into my next point. I am investing heavily in this platform to passively pay my rent in the spring semester. You heard that right while it won’t be all interest based (in fact its mostly principal based) I will attempt to use this platform to make a nice 6% or more return while being able to pull my money out and pay rent every month. This obviously has lots of risk and I have back up plans in place in the event most of my loans default however from what I’ve learned in the last year and a half this has been a pretty reliable strategy, and of course I make passive income while I am doing this with a decent return.

Now let’s back up a minute. Most of you are probably thinking I’ve got to be pulling in some big bucks to pay rent with this right! If any of you rent out there you’re probably thinking this is quite a stretch. If you didn’t see in any of my previous posts my rent here in my college town is dirt cheap I’m talking $275 a month + utilities which generally rounds out to $350/month. As of my last monthly payment update I am currently bringing in $195 in principal and interest a month! I’m not done yet either, the snowball has started to roll, I dumped in almost $3,000 this summer into my portfolio and when I get my bonus here soon another $1,000+ will go in + I’m starting to get monthly payments from the loans I purchased this summer. Come October/November I will be approaching that first tier of rent ($275). Not too shabby considering a 6% return on a passive income and its monthly.

With this next small deposit coming in this week I will be at ~230 notes and I am estimating I will need 315 or so to cover the $275 a month. Let’s take a quick look at my account summary, this first picture is adjusted account value which includes the defaults and the late notes.

lending club adjusted

This second picture does not account for late notes and shows a higher rate of return.

lending club no adjust

My account is out of whack at the moment, with the large influx of new notes there is quite a few that haven’t started paying out yet because they are so new. Like I said come October/November that should all get settled in and the returns will be coming up as the monthly payment number starts ringing true and all my loans start paying out.

As a disclaimer I am not a financial consultant and all investments carry risk. I am simply showing you all what I am doing and why I think it will work. Of course, I’d like to hear what you have to say. I know quite a few of my followers have been asking questions about this platform and the pros and cons of it. I have another post from way long ago on why I like this platform so much and you can read that post right Lending Club Review.

Have a great day and I can’t wait to hear from you guys!

Stock Portfolio update 9/14/18

Lots of people on Instagram ask what I am invested in or what others are invested in. Today we’ll go over all my positions and what I’m looking into in the future.

I currently have $9,750 funded in my Robinhood portfolio, however with dividends and profits I have made $670.92 throughout my time investing. I began investing with Robinhood in December of 2016 and have been growing my account ever since. My final funding round will be to round out my account to $10,000 by the end of September and I will not be putting any more money into the account for quite awhile after that. The screenshot below was taken a few days ago showing my account balance, you may notice that it is down a little bit from the $9,750 + $670 profit, but that’s alright I’ve dealt with both highs and lows of my portfolio balance.

IMG-2940.png

We’ll deep dive into some of my larger positions, first Chesapeake Energy (CHK) this was one of my first investments when I started investing and I have added and cost average the position down quite a bit over time. As you can see here we are down a little bit but nothing to worry about. I plan to continue to cost average a bit and try to sell some of my position when we reach around 20% profit or so.

IMG-2942.png

Another large position I own is Ulta Beauty (ULTA) this one has been a wild ride for sure. I owned it when it hit its all time high of ~$312 ish and I have also held it through its lowest point in some time dipping below $200. The market finally came back around to the beauty retailer and it is currently a decent little profit as you look at the cost average and return rate below. They have significant raised 12-18-month price targets of this stock and I plan to exit around $335 which would net a 30% profit or thereabouts.

IMG-2944.png

Another large position I own is Realty Income (O) I have owned this stock for a considerable time as well and it is a key player in my dividend income. In case you are unfamiliar with this stock, it is a monthly dividend paying REIT stock. It yields about 4.75% at my current cost average and has been a key factor and the liquidity of my portfolio when I don’t have funds coming into the account. I plan to hold this position for the foreseeable future and anytime it does dip down I plan to cost average down and buy more. A great example of this is when the 10-year bond was over 3% and many dividend stocks including O took a big hit as investors flocked to the high bond yield and security they provide.

IMG-2943.png

The above three positions are the largest in my portfolio, I would like to also include a few key stars to my portfolio below.

My apple position below is probably one of my best-timed trades. It was after the little correction in February and I picked up the cheapest Apple stock since October 2017, only issue… I couldn’t buy more, I was out of funds and couldn’t justify selling any portions of my other positions. As you can see I think going heavy into Apple at that time would have been the move to make but why cry over spilt milk.

IMG-2948.png

I also dabble in options trading, I’m not the greatest at it and I’ve lost a little bit of money and made a little bit as well. Below you can see my current options spread, I sold some of the SNAP puts for 40-115% profit today however the puts were very inexpensive, so I only really made like $10 off them.

IMG-2941.png

Ford (F) is another one of my large positions, currently at 100 shares with a cost average of $10.74 the blue oval isn’t doing too well for me. (-12%) I have been holding and growing my ford position for awhile now and I enjoy the nice dividends, (currently yields 5.6% based on cost average) again this is a huge part of my liquidity and fluidity of my portfolio in the coming months.

Proctor and Gamble is another proud pick up by yours truly. At a cost average of $74.40 we are up around 11% + a solid 3.8% yielding dividend. I picked this up in May 2018 at its lowest price it had in 2 years, another play with great timing, unfortunately I only purchased 2 shares and just like my Apple position I wish I bought more.

IMG-2949.png

Here are my recent deposits and dividends, I put $1,750 into my robinhood portfolio this summer and have collected lots of dividends as well. I am continuing to increase my forward dividend and hoping to reach $1,000 in passive income received for 2018. I am looking into further expanding my positions in Chinese stocks (JD, BABA) as well as Facebook (FB)

IMG-2950

stock portAs always let me know what you think and what positions you currently have!

 

Passive Income overview 9/5/18

Passive Income is all the rage these days, with ecommerce blowing up, YouTube, podcasts, blogs, investing etc. there are lots of reason why it should be something to think about. Let’ s dive into it and see what it is all about!

Passive income is income resulting from cash flow received on a regular basis, requiring minimal to no effort by the recipient to maintain it. (Wikipedia)

That sounds amazing! Minimal to no effort and receiving cash from it, but its not quite that simple. Passive income often requires either initial upfront energy, effort, and time or initial upfront cash.

My expertise is with the initial upfront cash portion, so we’ll get into that. I have been collecting data on my passive income for over a year now. I currently receive passive income in the form of interest payments from Lending Club, my savings account, stock dividends, stock interest payments, and I guess money saving apps as well. I won’t go into that last one in depth as I am saving that for an article in the future. Hopefully if you’ve been following me for awhile or are at all familiar with investing you understand what a stock dividend is. Essentially you own a dividend paying stock a every quarter or for every month you receive a little gift from the company in the form of a monetary payout for being their stockholder. I also receive some interest payments from my stocks when people short the stocks I own. Between my savings account interest, stock interest, dividends from both Robinhood and Stash I have received $186.37 this year. Not too shabby most would say, but this does come at a price to the tune of ~$12,500 invested in the above-mentioned platforms. The other vehicle I use for passive income is Lending Club. Currently I have received $233.74 in interest payments this year through that platform and that is to the tune of about $4,000 ish invested. A little calculator work later and we are at $420.11 this year in passive income, or about $46.68 per month.

I’m proud of that number to say the least but there’s more to come and in fact my goal for 2018 was to make $1,000 in passive income this year. There is still along way to go to reach that $1,000 mark and less than 3 months till the ball drops and we are standing in 2019.

My plan to get there is already in the works, I have a sizeable position building in Lending Club, in fact there is quite a lot of notes (loans) that haven’t paid me yet because they are so new. When that all comes clicking together and I continue to add to that platform I expect my interest payment payouts to sky rocket. I think I’ll put in another $1,000 into that platform or so and will be reinvesting the principals and interest payments to snowball that passive income stream and make it larger.

The other side of the coin is my stocks and etf’s I own. I have added around $750 into my stash positions and most of those pay dividends. I’ve also added $1400 to my robinhood portfolio and a decent chunk of that has gone to dividend stocks. I plan to continue to add to both and make profits on my positions to reinvest into dividend stocks as well as reinvest the dividends back from where they came from.

The goal for this is to reach financial freedom. There are various definitions to this but for my purpose it is to create passive income streams that are greater than my active income (the money I make from working). When you reach this and assuming you account for inflation, cost of living increasing etc. you can effectively retire. Now of course I don’t plan to retire super early and go live on a beach or anything like that, my mission is much bigger than that, however that is the ultimate plan.

You might be taking a look at this and scratching your head like, “Brandon, you’ve got a long way to go to replace your standard income if you aren’t even at $1,000 a year yet” and you are absolutely correct. My stock portfolio currently yields around 3%, for a modest $40,000 a year to live on my portfolio would have to be around $1.3 million at that same yield to produce that. That’s a lot of motherfucking money to reach financial freedom if you ask me.

That’s why I am looking into investing in real estate when I build my capital up. With real estate’s monthly cash flow and leverage assuming a modest 5% return not accounting for increasing rents or refinancing or anything like that an $800,000 property would yield $40,000 a year and with a 25% down payment of $200,000 you could control that. That looks much more attainable to me.

Using Grant Cardone’s 40% rule, profits from my investments, and existing passive income streams that will grow that should be attainable within a few years if all goes right.

As Warren Buffett said, “If you don’t find a way to make money while you sleep, you will work until you die.”

Now are these passive income streams passive, no. I actively invest in the stock market, I do research on the positions I take, I check lending club frequently and hand pick my loans that I invest in etc. But all in all they are pretty passive. Real estate on the other hand isn’t very passive until you get to the big leagues and can afford a property manager.

Grant’s new real estate investing book is in route to my door in STL and I will be giving that a read very soon and I plan to implement his plan and to go big on my first deal. We’re talking 24-32 units costing $1.4- 2.0 million requiring a down payment in the neighborhood of $500-700k. Like I said large upfront capital or large up-front work, time, energy.

I should also mention what I am doing right here follows that other method that I haven’t gone over. This blog while it does not produce any income and actually never has produced any income for me may be able to one day. Consider how much time I’ve spent (10 months, 60 blog posts, advertising, Instagram etc.) to get it to this point and still haven’t made a dime with it. That’s what I am talking about in terms of up front time, energy, and effort.

It will not be easy whatever passive income route you choose, but with a good strategy and the work you need to put into it the prize is pretty frickin nice.

Let me hear your passive income journey!

B^2