Premier Roofing update 7/23/18

We are fast approaching the end of my internship here with 3 weeks to go. This is a very critical timeframe because I may be able to get PFYNR’s completed with any new customers before I leave for the summer. After I leave my work will be handed off to my supervisor and I believe I will receive a bonus for any jobs that are still in progress from when I leave. Not sure exactly if that is the correct phrasing or if that is the correct bonus structure however we will get there when we get there, and I still have plenty of work to do before we get there.

I am currently at 25 sales as of writing this on July 23rd, this puts me just shy of the leaderboard which starts at 28 sales as of this morning. I do have an incredibly stacked pipeline however and I will explain that one a little further. My current stats are:

86 presented roofs

25 signed roofs

17 Do not have enough damage

9 PFYNR’s

5 built

As I mentioned the pipeline before, I have 25 potential sales in my pipeline, and 11 PFYNR’s. Not to mention what I am going out and selling currently. Much of my overall success in this internship rides on my performance in these last few weeks to close sales, put roofs in production and continue to deliver outstanding customer service. I need these sales and roofs in production for my own personal income as I am far off from my goal of $20,000 from this internship as I have originally planned. I’ve made $6200 this summer so far with thousands of dollars riding on my pipeline alone. Now my actual breakeven number is around $14,000 which is about what I made last year including my living stipend. I believe that is achievable when my pipeline, potential future sales, and my bonus are factored in.

So, my game plan is to just keep on keeping on and grinding this thing out. I have a build coming up this week which 5 sales in my pipeline are riding on. I’ve also moved to a new area that was recently struck with hail, I’ve only worked a ¼ day or so out there as I had an event this weekend I was leaving town for. It will be a little more difficult now as I have a little way to travel to this area and still have meetings and follow ups in my old section of neighborhood as well. I also have a block and a half that I still need to door knock and follow up in in my old neighborhood. This will make things more difficult, but I will make the most of it. If I can close my leads and work my pipeline I think that will bring some weight off my shoulders and we can start making some serious progress and drive this hard into the end of the internship.

As always, I will do my best to keep you all updated. Feel free to leave a comment.

B^2

Premier Roofing Update

How everyone is doing well I’m sorry its been awhile, while blogging and the content I am trying to deliver is one of my goals I’ve been more preoccupied with work and building my Instagram platform. Anyways as I write this post I have 22 sales with 3 dead. Its rather unfortunate as there is a tier at 25 sales which I wanted to hit about 2 weeks ago but I am still slowly struggling to get there. Several issues which have led to this, I have taken days off that I shouldn’t have, I’ve had other commitments on the weekends that took away from my time on the street. I am currently on my way back from a week-long vacation as well which has obviously taken away from my sales potential. I’ve also had sales fall through via failed inspections, cancelling the contract etc. Ultimately it is my fault for my shortcomings however some of the circumstances are out of my control.

Looking forward, I’ve had 3 builds completed and two more coming up this next week. Builds in general help me out with closing the deals in the surrounding areas, another opportunity to provide an excellent customer service experience, and of course my commission off the build ($200).

This next week I had a potential $1400 to be made as well as $1200 that I am waiting on an email for, hopefully we can get that all closed here shortly. I finished this last week up at $1300 and had a terrible week prior to that finishing at $100. Ultimately, I need to make over $1500 a week from this point on + my bonus to make up for the disappointing performance and hit my breakeven point ($14000). It may take less than that to reach a break even point (I apparently get some very nice tax breaks that I didn’t have at my previous job) which could make it easier to break even in comparison to the previous summer.

I want to finish this week with over 25 sales, I have an estimated $1400 on the table however I want to make more than that as I need to average approx. $1500 the rest of the summer. I’d also like to get my $1200 deal completed so I can move on with the builds for those before I leave for the summer.

I’ll do my best to keep you all updated as we progress and keep crushing goals throughout the summer and the foreseeable future.

As always feel free to leave a comment, I’d love to hear what you think!

Thanks, B^2

Leadership Positions that have Advanced my Life

In my life I’ve been fortunate enough to have plenty of leadership opportunities and I have taken advantage of them to further my personal development. Today I will be analyzing a few of them to give some better insight as to how they developed the person I am today, what knowledge and lessons I took away from them, and how you can also get involved and become a leader in your own field of interest.

Let’s start way back to boy scouts, for those of you who don’t know what the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), “The BSA’s goal is to train youth in responsible citizenship, character development, and self-reliance through participation in a wide range of outdoor activities, educational programs, and, at older age levels, career-oriented programs in partnership with community organizations. For younger members, the Scout method is part of the program to instill typical Scouting values such as trustworthiness, good citizenship, and outdoors skills, through a variety of activities such as camping, aquatics, and hiking.” – Wikipedia

I was involved in Boy Scouts all my life essentially, from a Cub Scout when I was in first grade all the way to Eagle Scout at 17 years old. Through my time there as it mentions above I learned a lot and I put myself in positions to further develop my character. These include, Patrol Leader, Senior Patrol Leader, and Junior Assistant Scout Master. To break down some of these further clarify the situation, Patrol leader essentially led a patrol (for us that was between 8-15 scouts) and you were responsible for your patrol on camping trips, each patrol was responsible for cooking their own food, cleaning up their own mess etc. Senior Patrol leader oversaw all the patrols that comprised the troop (we normally had between 3 and 4 patrols), your job was to ensure all the patrols were functioning accordingly. Junior Assistant Scout Master was a position that brought me another tier above Senior Patrol Leader and I assisted the SPL in making decisions and relaying information to the Scout Master.

Through all these positions you had to effectively communicate to your peers who were both younger and older than you were, as well as adult leaders in the troop. You were essentially responsible that the young men you oversaw were doing their part and contributing to the task at hand. As you advanced through the ranks you started leading by example and teaching the younger guys what they needed to do and how to do it. Although everyone in the world at the time thought Boy Scouts were gay and it was a stupid program, I had incredible opportunities to travel and do cool things (white water rafting, snow skiing, Pike’s Peak, hiking, climbing, canoeing, archery, rifle and shotgun shooting etc.) that other kids didn’t have the opportunity to do. That in addition to vast amount of survival skills and knowledge I accumulated I also was able to develop leadership skills that others forsake. This also lead into my other leadership roles and opportunities later in life that we will now go over.

Next, was High School Wrestling captain. This wasn’t as involved as the Boy Scout leadership positions that I had previously, but it did mean something. Essentially you ran warm ups for practice assisted the coach in demonstrations and provided advice and inspiration to those around you. This position required very little outside work that wasn’t already required to be a starting varsity wrestler, not much to say about this. In other sports Team Captain may have some more meaning however wrestling is both individual and team oriented but more so individual.

Next up would be involving my Fraternity in my currently ongoing college career. As I write I still have 2 more semesters to go with 12 and 9 credit hours respectively. I have been a part of Sigma Chi Fraternity since my freshman year in the Fall of 2014 and am still heavily involved in the fraternity even as I approach my 5th and final year. I have held a ton of positions for the fraternity including, Recruitment chair, Greek week chair, Social chair, Vice President, houseman, Philanthropy Chair, and brotherhood chair. While there is leadership and character development in all of those positions I want to focus on Vice President as the primary one.

As Vice President I essentially oversaw internal operations of the chapter, ran the executive committee and its meetings, ran the post initiation training of newly initiated brothers, oversaw all the committee positions. It was quite an interesting year in my position, possibly the hardest terms as Vice President we’ve ever had to deal with. We had several executive members get co-op (extended internships) after they were already elected so we had to elect new exec members, we had new national policies implemented that nobody saw coming, had to drop several people from their committee positions due to grades, overcommitted and unable to do fulfill their position. It was a mess and I was already under a strenuous workload and amount of stress. We did survive, and I think we turned out better than we started but It wasn’t easy and really challenged me.

Couple things I learned, things can and do go wrong (shit happens, get ready to roll with the punches and adapt). People suck, I don’t say this to be mean, but people tend to be forgetful and take the easy way out when they can which puts more strain on you. Another important lesson I use was taught to me when I was a pledge and it was an adaptation of this parable.

 

“Os Hillman tells the story of a rider on horseback, who many years ago, came across a squad of soldiers who were trying to move a heavy piece of timber.

A corporal stood by, giving lordly orders to “Heave.”

But the piece of timber was too heavy for the squad.

“Why don’t you help them?” asked the quiet man on the horse, addressing the important corporal.

“Me?  Why, I’m a corporal sir!”

Dismounting, the stranger carefully took his place with the soldiers.

“Now, all together boys – heave!” he said.  And the big piece of timber slid into place.

The stranger mounted his horse and addressed the corporal.  “The next time you have a piece of timber for your men to handle, corporal, send for your commander-in-chief.”

The horseman was George Washington, the first American President.

I love this story as it reminds me that leadership isn’t barking orders at your staff, it’s helping them with the heavy lifting.

 

It simply states that the leader must also contribute and do the heavy lifting just like the men he leads. The same applies to the fraternity and leading by example. While we are not a large chapter we stand around 50 members give or take, so within that group there are young men of different temperaments, talents and convictions that must be handled in separate ways when issues arise. I learned how to cater to different people’s temperaments from the shy quiet freshman who was underperforming to the drunk disorderly super senior enjoying his last hurrah.

The last leadership position I currently partake in is Missouri S&T Miner Rugby captain. Now I have been in this position for a solid year perhaps longer. I think I was unofficially the captain for a little bit but for the last 2 semesters that was made clear. This is an interesting one because there are many positions and situations I am faced with. To my team on the field, I make the play calls and control the game. To the Sir (the referee) I communicate all issues that my teammates bring to me and express my concerns with the Sir. I sometimes take a back seat on practices and let the president make the calls on that but I voice my opinion on that as well. After the game, I am no different than anyone else on the team, there to have a good time and enjoy the spoils of victory.

Again, there is a lot to be learned from this position, I address my teammates on the field on game day much differently than at practice. I also address the sir differently than my teammates. I juggle between who needs to get more playing time and who needs to get on the field to deliver the best performance.

Overall, I have been a leader in many aspects of my life, all different, all unique in their on way. I think that it is important to have that diversity because it gives you more tools in your toolbox to handle the different situations you may face out in the real world. It also presents you with various challenges that will build your character and your problem-solving abilities as you struggle between the pros and cons of situations. I would highly suggest getting involved in some organization, club, sport etc. that you enjoy and look for a meaningful way to contribute whether that would be a leadership position such as the ones I’ve mentioned above, or a minor position. Getting involved, developing communication, problem solving, and leadership skills will make a lasting impact and help prepare you for your future endeavors in your career or activities later in life. Take advantage of the opportunities that are available to you now rather than wasting away your time, because in 10 years the lessons you learned from getting involved will get you further than that tv episode you watched.

As always, feel free to leave a comment below I would love to hear from your guys!

B^2

 

Premier Roofing week 4 and 5

Well it’s been an interesting one.

Let’s see we sandbagged week 4 because I couldn’t really get anything going, it was the weird middle ground of running out of potential customers on my old street and just starting out a new street and trying to earn the trust of my customers in the area. I only had 1 sale and 1 PFYNR ($300 total) for that week and we pushed those onto week 5.

Now week 5 gets me heated. Very heated. It turned out well I made $1100 on the week but in all honesty, it should’ve been around a $1500 week. The last $400 could have been made up very easily with some customers doing their part and communicating with me. It would have worked out much better on both of our ends. That was very frustrating but now the wheels are turning on this beast of a position I am in. Week 5’s slightly disappointing results should lead into a stellar week 6. I would like to finish the week at $2,000 but we will see how we do, as I’ve mentioned previously some of this is simply out of my control. I mean when I call and text a customer 3 separate times over the course of 5 days for some information and they don’t deliver it to me and I knock on their door trying to get a hold of them there’s not much more I can do.

I also can’t control when my supervisor gets his paperwork and estimates together, I am waiting on two of those to be completed to schedule 2 PFYNR’s this week. Either way though, I have finally been gaining traction and gaining momentum in the areas I’ve been working in. With my first build happening on Wednesday this week and several insurance inspections already scheduled for Monday, Tuesday and possibly Wednesday we should be getting well on our way here shortly.

A couple more street signs, couple more claims approved, couple more builds and we will be moving forward with so much momentum and reach that I will be pulling money in hopefully. It was just a shame that we ran into some claims that didn’t go through because of bad luck, lack of communication, and drones that don’t do a very good job at inspecting. Either way we’ll keep pushing on like we always have.

This is absolutely needed because I am well below what I need to average to make the equivalent amount that I did last summer. I will do my best to update you but definitely check out my twitter @bsquaredweb10, my Instagram @ bsquared.website and of course this blog.

I will be doing my best to keep the content rolling and keep providing value and inspiration to my followers. I had a message in my inbox for a while on Instagram (it was in the requested message potion, sorry it took 3 weeks for me to notice it!) and it was the first time that someone said they actively followed me and were inspired by what I was doing and was asking what they should be doing. That was a huge honor for me and I hope I can inspire and help others soon!

Rental Property Empire

I gotta be honest this really was a rough one. This book is loaded with quality information, but it is so dense and tough to read and to write about and I’m going to apologize for this on in advance. The reading time suggested on this book is 6 hours and 57 minutes at 332 pages. It took me two goal periods to do it as well because I was a chore to read but I finished it. I never gave up on it, I will give a quick summary just to keep myself honest with you guys, but I think your time would be better spent watching some YouTube videos or doing specific research online rather than read this book just because it would be much more enjoyable and quicker.

Build a Rental Property Empire: The no-nonsense book on finding deals, financing the right way, and managing wisely by Mark Ferguson. You can follow Mark’s blog at Investfourmore.com

Career highlights: Owns 16 rentals which generate $8,000 monthly income and have $1.6 million in equity. Flips 10-20 houses per year with averaged profit of $30,000 each. Started InvestFourMore.com real estate blog in 2013 and gets over 300,000 views a month.

“If you focus on mastering one thing, you will be much more successful than if you halfway do 10 things at once.”

Chapter 1: Why Rental Properties Will Help You Retire Faster than Investing in the Stock Market.

Mark goes very deep in this chapter and considers historical return rates, inflation, his personal surveys he’s conducted, tax benefits, outliving retirement etc. I’ll quickly summarize this Real Estate produces more cash flow than the equivalent investment in dividend paying stocks. Real estate also appreciates consistently in the long term just like the stock market does. You can retire earlier than 65 with real estate, in fact you can “retire” when your passive rental property income exceeds your living expenses. Because dividend paying stocks, bonds, savings accounts etc. can not keep up with your living expenses you will have to withdraw money from those accounts, once they are depleted you are simply out of money. If you have rental property which generates income above your living expenses than if those rentals are occupied and paying rent, you will be able to live off the cash flow without tapping into the foundational equity (selling the property). People are living longer than they were before, so it is not unlikely that my generation (currently 22 years old) could have a life expectancy of 90+ years and you wouldn’t want to run out of money during your retirement.

Chapter 2: What are the Risks of Investing in Real Estate?

I’m sure you’ve all seen it before, the little disclaimer saying something to the effect that all investments carry a certain amount of risk and the investor should be aware of that risk. Rental properties are no different as they are just as much of an investment as a stock, bond, bitcoin etc. I believe the risk is lower than some of the previously mentioned and here’s why. A stock can go to zero, if a company goes bankrupt a stock can go to zero or near zero levels, resulting in 99% loss. They don’t make any more land, the very land that your property sits on has some inherit value because there is a limited amount of land in the world and as the human population continues to grow we need to utilize the land for some productive use whether for living or growing food or infrastructure. The exception would be if you had a hazardous waste situation or radioactive event on the land (think Chernobyl) which would render the land useless for some long stretch of time. So looking at the worst case scenario real estate already is winning. Another aspect is people always need a place to live, they may not always need to product or service that a company provides (think typewriters). These are the extreme scenarios now let’s get into the more common ones. Often people over estimate their returns and revenue, they may forget or underestimate the costs to acquire the property and or renovate it. In general, when doing the number crunching for a property it would be wise to use worse case scenario numbers and incorporate buffer into your calculations. Your rental property needs to be cash flow positive from day 1 and you should not count on appreciation for your pay out because that may never happen with the changing market conditions.  Another money related risk people don’t consider is having funds in reserve, typically banks require 6 months of mortgage payments in reserve on all properties. Besides that, you should always have some extra cash on hand in case the renovations or repairs are costlier than anticipated.

“Resistance is a sign that you are close to your goals and close to a breakthrough” I believe that with all my heart, as this internship I am currently working as well as life has taught me that this is very true.

“The key to any successful real estate investing strategy is to purchase properties below market value.” This is because you receive instant equity, for example if a house’s market value is $100,000 and you can purchase it for $90,000, while the cash is not in your pocket you have effectively made $10,000 from that deal.

“A great piece of advice I recently heard is to never work below your income. If you are worth $100 per hour, do not do tasks you can delegate for $20 an hour. Focus on things that make you that $100 per hour or more and let someone else do the less important work.” This is just sound advice to anyone making elevated levels of income and are looking to grow. The $40 you save every week by cutting your own grass, while frugal, could be hurting you overall if that time could be better spent developing your business, making more sales, expanding your presence in the community/social media.

Chapter 3: How do you know what makes a good rental property Investment?

  • Did I buy it below market value and by how much?
  • How much does it cash flow each month?
  • What are my cash-on-cash returns?
  • What do the prospects look like for the market in which I am buying?

You can use his cash flow calculator on his blog to help calculate that. He also goes over how he accounts for vacancies (table shown below), and maintenance (table shown below.

Vacancies:

Single Family 5%
College Rental 10%
Multifamily 10%

Maintenance:

Good Average Needs Work
0-10 Years 5% 10% 15%
10-50 years 10% 15% 20%
50 Years + 15% 20% 25%

He also suggests not using blanket rules to determine profitability, because they simply aren’t accurate enough and do not account for all situations. This means that you’re going to need to do some number crunching.

Here’s a simple rule to avoid losing your property to foreclosure, “buy for cash flow, have reserves, and don’t expect appreciation as your only way to make money.” Mark states that his target for cash flow is $500 a month for the $80,000 – $140,000 properties he buys and likes to see a 15% cash on cash return but prefers closer to 20%. Don’t worry about your cash on cash return until all expenses are paid, and the house is rented. Until that happens you’re only guessing.

Chapter 4: How do you Know what type of investment property to buy?

Mark analyzes single family vs. multi-family vs. college rentals. Essentially its best to invest in the type of property the follows the above-mentioned criteria in chapter 3. Not all areas are going to be the same. You may be able to get single family homes below market value in Colorado, but perhaps multi-family complexes are cheap in Illinois, and a recent state college has had enrollment increase 5% for consecutive years and the college rentals are dirt cheap in the area with rising rents. All situations are different, but I can review the pros and cons of each type of property. Single family generally have better vacancy rates and less turnover than the other two. They also have plenty of opportunity to be bought below market value. The multifamily buildings have multiple tenants so if there is a vacancy it is not a 0 or 100% situation. That as well as in today’s market climate people tend to move more often and apartments are becoming more popular. College rentals typically can get higher rent rates than the previously mentioned types of properties however they typically require more maintenance costs. I am very interested in college rentals however due to my feeder system for people to move into it as well as my love for my fraternity and my college town. There is a lot of detail in this chapter in fact according to my kindle it takes 45 minutes to read this chapter. Condo’s, HOA, vacation real estate, commercial real estate, CAP rate, what neighborhood to buy in, and more are included in this chapter.

Expenses that should be included in the calculations are:

  • Property taxes
  • Property Insurance
  • Property Management Fees
  • Utilities paid by property owner
  • Ongoing maintenance paid by property owner
  • Vacancies
  • Expected maintenance expenses
  • HOA fees
  • Any onsite management

Neighborhood characteristics:

  • Crime rates
  • School ratings
  • House prices
  • Age of houses
  • Size of houses
  • Size of the town
  • Proximity to large populations areas
  • Local economy
  • HOA’s
  • Types of houses (multifamily or single-family)
  • Tax rates

Chapter 5: How do you buy real estate below market value?

Mark suggests using a professional opinion to figure out market value of properties. “I would not trust Zillow to provide house values, although you can get some great information from Zillow.” Mark goes in depth on how exactly to buy homes below market value in short sales, HUD homes, banked own properties, how to get great deals from the MLS etc. Some notes that I have highlighted are, “with rising prices, real estate agents or sellers sometimes underprice houses.” “If a real estate agent is not paying attention to market price increases; if a house needs some work or if the sellers simply want to sell their house quickly, it could mean opportunity for investors.” Speed often is the difference between getting a great deal and missing out, a bidding war indicates that a house is priced great and many people want it.

Some things to look for include: Aged listings, MLS comments, Fast price changes, back on the market. “Do not give up if another offer is accepted, and do not burn bridges.” Again, this is a 45-minute chapter with lots of detail, so I will again highlight some of the key points.

“When you talk to a seller, you want to highlight the advantages of selling to you:

  • No repairs needed
  • No commissions
  • No closing costs
  • Fast closing
  • Cash Closing
  • No showings
  • No appraisal

Successful investors know their market like no on else, and they are honest and follow through on deals if they say they will buy a house.

Chapter 6: How to finance and pay for Rental properties.

In this chapter Mark discusses financing vs. cash deals, highlighting the use of leverage and the ability to acquire more properties in a shorter amount of time. As far as how much money you will need to start investing in rental properties typically 20-25% down is typical, from there closing cost, repair cost, carrying cost are all needed. Typically, the bank requires 6 months of payment reserves and you must also need adequate cash for any major repairs that may arise. Good credit scores and financial stability are of course desired for financing, most lenders want to see a debt-to-income ratio of 45% or lower.  He then goes in depth on various loans and how to improve your debt to income ratio, and various loan alternative.

Chapter 7: How to invest in rental properties with less cash

There are various no or low money down alternatives to real estate investing, but due diligence is certainly required. There is also hard money, house hacking, private money, turn key rental properties, seller financing, partnerships, using credit cards for cash advances, a 401k, and cash out refinance. Usually standard financing practices are better than the above mentioned, less headache hassle and risk.

Chapter 8: How to repair and maintain rental properties

Typically, Mark spends less money on long term rentals in terms of repairs than his fix and flips. Renters typically are not as picky as buyers which also helps with this. In a flip he repairs and updates nearly everything, in a rental its what’s needed. Finding a great contractor is vital and most investors are not well suited to do the repairs themselves in terms of opportunity cost and how well they can do the work versus a professional. Constant communication between you and the contractor is vital as it will affect the quality and time it takes to do the work.

Chapter 9: How to manage your rental properties

Most of the time it takes to manage rental properties happens at the beginning when it comes to finding tenants, the repair process etc. Once that has been completed it takes much less time to manage, however, once you have four or more you should consider hiring additional help. You may open a can of worms if you do not have enough time to screen tenants and check your properties. Proper due diligence is needed to find good property management, as with all things involving real estate, taking the cheap way may cause more headache than necessary.

Chapter 10: What are the different exit strategies with Rental Properties

There are several exit strategies to consider, sell the property and pay closing costs and taxes, 1031 exchange the property for a similar one, pay off the mortgage early and sell. All of these are again discussed in detail, a quick note on paying the mortgage off early, if you plan to keep buying rentals I would not recommend because you’re wasting prime cash to pay the down payment on your next purchase. Also, debt that makes more than the interest on the note is good debt and leverages your returns. The only negative aspect of incurring multiple loans on rentals is your debt-to-income ratio increases which may make it difficult to obtain another loan.

Chapter 11: How to buy rentals in an expensive market

For one the cost associated with selling your rentals, the taxes you’d have to pay, closing costs, the headache and hassle often isn’t worth the gain from appreciation, and the lack of steady cash flow that you’ve been receiving. If your market is overpriced you may need to look at turnkey rentals, however this makes it very difficult in executing the purchase, knowing the market. Investing near your area is in your best interest although it’s not always possible.

Chapter 12: How do you build a rental property empire

Here’s some basic steps to build a rental property empire:

  • When do you want to buy your first property?
  • What type of property will you buy?
  • What type of financing will you use?
  • How much money will you need?
  • How much money will the property generate?

“Saving money gives you options that allow you to make much more money, such as investing in rental properties and buying fix and flips. Saving money also allows you to be more flexible with your career or even a start a business.”

Chapter 13: What is the next step?

Do it.

Here’s the book:

https://amzn.to/2Mh8b8n

Premier Roofing Week 2 and 3

Sorry to keep you guys waiting on the update for my internship. I was out of town for the holiday weekend so my week 2 and 3 were discontinuous so I decided to group them together as best as I could. Overall week 2 went alright, I was out on my own going door to door and managed to make 2 sales that week while still putting a lot of time and effort into my training. I was still without WI-FI so that was rough, but my roommate also arrived in town so at least I wasn’t alone anymore. Week 3 is where I hit a stroke of luck. I managed to get 2 more sales and I sold a group of 6 rental properties bring my total up to 8 for that week! I was awarded the “Ace of the Week” for premier roofing and earned my rookie stripes (10 total sales). In addition to 8 sales I also had a PFYNR (prepare for your new roof meeting) where the customer and I discuss the two estimates and pick shingle colors etc. That earned me a little bit more for that pay period! That impressive performance and a little bit of luck that week earned me $1000 and some cool Knick knacks from the company.

As I am coming to the end of this week’s pay period (Thursday at midnight) I am not really looking at a big week like I had before. I have several potential sales in the pipeline and a PFYNR scheduled for Thursday afternoon. As of now it looks like I’ll be under my draw ($500) this week unfortunately. This may work in my best benefit however because this next pay period is looking quite juicy, several PFYNR’s, several sales in the pipeline, a sale already scheduled for Monday etc. I may be trading a poor week for a stellar week. Unfortunately, I still have plenty of ground to make up, as of this paycheck on Friday I will be $1500 short of what I was making last summer, granted that is to be expected in your first couple weeks as you aren’t making nearly the sales or the higher commission portions of the process in your first 2 weeks. I would like to see this next pay periods paycheck north of $2,000 though as I have investments to make, money to save, bills to pay, and necessities to buy. If you’ve been keeping up with my Instagram posts you can see I have some ambitious goals to tackle this June and I am trying to fire at all cylinders always to achieve that. To name a few, $25k net worth, $1000 savings, 30 sales and 200 notes for lending club. We’ll see what I can do to achieve that, I believe that since this is my last week of time consuming training for work that I will be able to better invest my time into passive income efforts, this blog and making wise investment choices.

As always feel free to leave a comment below!

B^2

Internship: Week 1

If you haven’t heard yet, I am interning at Premier Roofing Company in Kansas City as one of their sales reps this summer. This is far different from my previous co-op (Samtec, various engineering positions) and my internship (Caterpillar, manufacturing engineer). So far, it’s going well, I have learned the sales script and I am currently assigned to 3 blocks of a street which is about 92 houses. I was training with my supervisor from Tuesday to Thursday out on the streets going door to door and inspecting roofs. We made a sale on Tuesday and Wednesday but had no luck Thursday. Today (Friday May 18, 2018) was my first day out on my own for my current territory. I hit the streets at 2pm and went through any remaining houses that we have not spoken to the owners yet out of the 92 on my list, I made it through the first round of door knocks by 3:30 and I had time to kill and I went down the street to the local Starbucks and got to use the Wi-Fi. You quickly realize how much you take Wi-Fi for granted when you don’t have it and neither does your place of work (the streets that is, the office has Wi-Fi). I was back out on the streets at 4:30ish and did another lap through my territory and I was able to inspect 2 roofs, 1 had appropriate damage and 1 was essentially brand new, a 1-year old roof. Couldn’t close the damaged roof and we will follow up with that customer in the coming weeks. I did have 3 major downfalls today, 1.) a potential sale said that her and her husband wanted to wait on filing the claim, 2.) I tried to get my yard sign in the yard of one of the roof’s we inspected with a woman waiting to file a claim and she did not let me put the sign up, 3.) a house that we got approved by the adjuster to replace, her neighbor that shares the garage with her didn’t even want an inspection so that will cause some headaches in the future.

Anyway, looking ahead, I have this weekend with my 3 blocks still, we are approaching the 80% saturation rate we are looking to accomplish. I believe I counted 32/44 house saturation on my first section of the neighborhood. This comes out to 73% saturation and I am at 6 door knocks for most of my houses, so we’ll see what this weekend brings. They are calling for scattered thunderstorms for Saturday and Sunday which could cause some issues. Hopefully I can close some deals and start boosting up this next upcoming paycheck. My first paycheck comes in Friday which includes my training flat rate and my 2 sales with my supervisor. My next paycheck currently only includes the training flat rate.

With the end of the month soon approaching my credit card bill is due as well as June rent, on the Brightside my roommate gets here Sunday afternoon, so I will have someone to talk to and do things with.

Continue to look for updates about my internship, the stock market, and what I am reading/reviewing. I am pushing and shoving this summer and I finally got settled into my job and the apartment and everything so it’s going to be full speed ahead from now on.

If you have any tips on getting off work on a sales job of this sort, please let me know! I have tons of other commitments this summer, however, everything is on the weekends and that is my prime selling time. I know I won’t be able to go to everything and see everyone but there are critical times that I need to go attend to other business and my hope is to outperform all my peers in this job and that would give me some leeway with my schedule.

As always, thanks for reading and leave a comment below!

B^2

Crush It! Book review and synopsis

I just got done reading “Crush it! Why NOW is the Time to Cash In on Your Passion” by Gary Vaynerchuk and while the book is a little old I really enjoyed it. It was published in 2009 which is ancient in terms of social media. The concepts however still exist, and it is a great viewpoint of emerging platforms coming into the scene which may help you catch the next big wave in the social media world. Without further delay let’s look at it!

Chapter 1: Passion Is Everything

In this chapter Gary Vaynerchuk describes his previous endeavors and what it took him to get there. He describes his three rules he lives by.

Love your family.

Work superhard.

Live your passion.

These are his guidelines which have proven effective and have made him happy in his life. “Since the only investment it takes to use these sites to grow a business is ridiculous amounts of time and hustle, these platforms are open to whoever has got the chops to get in the game.”

“Social Media = Business Period”

An important lesson to take away from this chapter is “No matter how successful you get, you can not slack off or the grass is going to grow, the paint is going to peel, and the roads will start to crumble. Stop hustling, and everything you learn here will be useless. Your success is entirely up to you.”

Chapter 2: Success Is in Your DNA

This chapter essentially can be summed up as stick to what you’re good at and “you gotta be you”. We also get a little perspective from GaryVee and his younger years of trading baseball cards and learning about the wine and liquor store business. “I knew from my experience with the baseball card business that people want to be told what’s good and valuable, and that they enjoy feeling like they’ve been turned on to something not everyone can appreciate.” This quote is then followed by, “storytelling is by far the most underrated skill in business.” I believe this to be very true, having good story telling skills, communication skills, being personable all helps in the world of business.

Chapter 3: Build Your Personal Brand

“Wine Library TV was neve about selling wine on the Internet. It was always about building brand equity.” In this chapter GaryVee talks about how to build your personal brand. While explaining why authenticity is key, how quality filters people out and the cream always rises, and how your personal brand is the same thing as a living, breathing resume.

“Developing your personal brand is key to monetizing your passion online. Whether you’re delivering your content by video, podcast or blog it’s the authentic you, the one thing that is guaranteed to differentiate you from everybody else, including those who share your niche or business model. The thing that most people don’t realize is that in today’s world your business and your personal brand need to be one and the same, whether you’re selling organic fish food or financial advice or jus your opinion.”

Chapter 4: A Whole New World

               In this chapter GaryVee talks about the evolving world and how being innovative and adaptable to the circumstances is going to allow many more opportunities than the old style of business. He describes how you need to plan your future. How you should start building your brand equity and work on things on the side, which we will get to in a minute.

Chapter 5: Create Great Content

               “To monetize your personal brand into a business using social marketing networks, two pillars need to be in place: product and content.” To do this you really need to know your stuff and be constantly absorbing information and content about your subject. GaryVee suggests that you need at least 50 blog topics that you’re amped to write about to get a feel for the situation of your blog. Then you need to tell a story about the topic. “Tell me your story, and if you’re good, I’ll come back for more.” “Communicate with me, because whoever is the best communicator will win.” In order to create great content, you can’t lie to yourself about your abilities to deliver quality information. “Am I good enough to be the best blogger about tech in the world?” is an example of a question that you must ask yourself and have a solid “Yes!” answer to. Choosing the correct medium is critical, if you’ve ever seen Gary Vaynerchuk his enthusiasm and loudness makes him a perfect fit for a video or vlog format. “Today, everybody else can make $40,000 to a million, so long as they can nail the correct combination of their medium and passion.” “Know yourself. Choose the right medium, choose the right topic, create awesome content, and you can make a lot of money being happy.”

Chapter 6: Choose Your Platform

               Your three options are video, audio, or written word, you must choose the platform that works best with your DNA. Although I personally use written word at the moment I think this Summer I will begin to move to video and venture out to YouTube and Vlog format. “Your website is for communicating logistics and facilitating sales; your blog is for communicating the essence of your brand.” In December 2008 GaryVee used social media and traditional advertising methods for his winelibrary.com to promote a free shipping code. The social media promotion which was free, outperformed the conventional advertising by a factor of 10. This is an example of platform is everything.

Mr. Vaynerchuk then talks about Tumblr and WordPress the two dominant blog platforms and both are still relevant even today. Tumblr’s ability to tumble posts is the word of mouth you want from your audience and other apps that have similar features are critical in expanding your brand. Call to action buttons are always important to continue the chain of communication with your audience, and eventually sell them your product. He then talks about Facebook and the importance of your own profile and then your fan page. “If you’ve been using a regular profile or created a group for your business, don’t take it down. Simply leave a link on your old profile or group page that feeds to your new fan page.” Twitter, one of GaryVee’s most powerful brand-building tools. “First, it has incredible endorsement power.” “Second, it’s a press release opportunity, allowing companies and businesses to have a closer relationship with their consumer.” “Third, Twitter is a research and development tool that allows you to crowdsource.” “Fourth it allows even your most mundane questions to become opportunities for conversation.” “Fifth, it’s a great vehicle through which to spread your commerce-driven intentions.” “The best use for Twitter, though, is to lure people to your blog.” GaryVee then shares the simple most powerful, best business tweet of all time. “What can I do for you?” Don’t forget you’re in business to serve your community.

“If your blog is your home, platforms like Twitter and Facebook are your vacation homes. You can’t do long form content on these sites (well, you can, but its not effective and I don’t recommend it)”.

He then talks about video content sites including the power player still today, YouTube. He very rarely uses analytics and trusts his instincts over numbers. Lastly you must differentiate yourself from your peers, and he will explain that in the upcoming chapters.

Chapter 7: Keep It Real…Very Real

               “Your DNA dictates your passion-whatever it is you were born to do; being authentic, and being perceived as such by your audience, relies on your ability to ensure that every decision you make when it comes to your business is rooted being true to yourself.” You should invest in the important stuff and that’s not cameras or microphones, no, that is your content, your passion, your knowledge. “If you want to dominate the social media game, all of your effort has to come from the heart”. Hustle and patience are the next two items of discussion, there’s plenty of other books and videos on hustle, I’ve already reviewed one, “The 10X Rule” and I will review another one soon “Rise and Grind”. Reference those books and articles as that is their main topic. Patience is self-explanatory, but we are often not patient. GaryVee says he gets people saying they haven’t seen any results and they’ve been working on their blog for 6 weeks. I can say from my own personal experience that I’ve been working on this blog for about 5 months and we are finally getting some traction, all things worth doing in life take time to get there.

Chapter 8: Create Community: Digging Your Internet Trench

               Creating community is much more important than the design of your blog. This is done by starting conversation with your audience. “To create an audience for your personal brand you’re going to get out there, shake hands, and join every single online conversation already in play around the world about your topic, Every. Single. One. “At a certain point, your business will start gaining eyeballs and your community focus will change. Whereas at this point you’re initiating contact with anyone who might have an interest in your passion, later you will spend these late-night hours responding to the people who have responded to you. Building and sustaining community is a never-ending part of doing business.” You do this by using all of your tools and platforms and seeking out every mention of your topic and commenting on every single tweet, blog post, forum post etc. that you can find and then do it again and again and again. I can say from experience the little I have done this for blogs and Instagram it has worked. It just takes lots of time and hustle to pull it off in the large scale. You must then capture your audience and I have struggle to do this with my own blog and would love to hear any advice from my viewers. “The day you see that one person is reading or watching or listening to you is a day to celebrate.”

Chapter 9: The Best Marketing Strategy Ever

               Care.

Chapter 10: Make the World Listen

               Here is the step by step guide for the rest of your life to achieve what is described in this book.

  1. Go to GoDaddy.com and try to buy your name in both .com and .tv
  2. Start a WordPress or Tumblr account to host the domain you just bought.
  3. Hire a web designer for your website.
  4. IF you’re filming a video blog, buy the $150 flip cam, something small, light and hopefully HD to film anywhere at any time.
  5. Create a Facebook Fan page
  6. Open a twitter account with your domain name
  7. Open a Tube Mogul if you are doing video. Open a Ping.fm if you are doing a written blog.
  8. Start pumping out content.
  9. Tweet or post your content to distribute to your platforms.
  10. Go to Search. Twitter and start searching terms relevant to your topic, and start following them.
  11. Go to blogsearch.google.com and start leaving comments on topics relevant to your content.
  12. Join as many active Facebook groups relevant to your topic as possible.
  13. Rinse and Repeat.

Do steps 5-8 and 12 over and over as long as your brand exists. “Anything is better than zero” but also “the longer you hold out to monetize your blog, the better.”

Chapter 11: Start Monetizing

               “Here’s a better idea: #1—classy banner ads, which appear at the top or bottom of your site (don’t overdo it!). #2—Go to google.com, search your subject matter, and check every blog and website to see which companies pay for Google AdSense ads to be posted. Cold-call every relevant company that is buying space on Google AdSense—they’re already spending the ad money on the Web, why not spend it on you? You can find a video on this topic on GaryVaynerchuk.com:” Speaking engagements, Affiliate Programs, Retail, Articles, Seminars, Books and TV, Consulting, Advertising redux, are all examples on monetizing your brand and there have been significant improvements and all of these fields, so I would recommend newer information than what is provided here.

Chapter 12: Roll with It

               Be prepared to continue repeating what makes you successful but be ready to adapt to the changing environment considering the great speed at which social media changes nowadays. Put out fires and situations quickly through the use and ability to reach out using social media is very important in retaining your brand equity. Spot latest trends as they begin and hop on the train early to give yourself a big advantage over the slower moving businesses in your sector.

Chapter 13: Legacy is Greater Than Currency

               We are all in the public eye now, we are constantly adding to our footprint on the internet. If things go wrong, there will be no where to hide as your whole brand is available to see. Thinking long term and knowing what you do and say today can affect your future is an important thing to remember in your early years of building your brand. “Legacy is the mortar of successful, lasting brands.

Conclusion: The Time is Now, the Message is Forever

               “true success—financial, personal, and professional—lies above all in loving your family, working hard, and living your passion.”

As always thank you for reading this article, I hope you gained some value information from this review and synopsis of “Crush It”. This book has provoked me to take a hard look at my blog and my personal brand and what I want it to be in the future and I look forward to shaping my brand from what I’ve learned in this book and what I intend to learn from “Crushing It”.

As always let me know what you think!

B^2

Crush It!: Why NOW Is the Time to Cash In on Your Passion

The Next Level

Many want to take their life, finances, current situation to the next level. Some have a vision of what that is, even fewer have a game plan to get themselves there. I will share with you today my vision and how I intend to get there.

So, as we speak I am 22 years old pursuing a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering and engineering management. I have a net worth around $18,000 through mainly my co-op and internship salaries. I will graduate college in May of 2019 and take on the real world.

Vision:

This is always a hard question to articulate and put into words which is why few people get this far. Think about it, when was the last time you sat down and figured out where you want to go in life. Some may have small goals like I want to drive a Ferrari or a Lamborghini but what about the BIG goal.

I would like to first buy my parent’s the lake house of their dreams on table rock lake. My mom and dad have provided for me all their life it is my obligation to give back to them. My dad would like the top of the line jet ski and a nice boat, my mom would be happy with a home that looked like it came out of better homes and gardens, a nice greenhouse and an abundance of grandchildren. My mom is going to have to wait on the later, but my brother may be able to help me out with that one. That is my first and foremost goal.

Second, I would like to give back to the people and organizations that made me who I am today, my wrestling program in high school, my rugby program in both high school and college, and my fraternity to name a few.

Third, is an obvious one but I think it should be said, to provide for those around me. I am going to assume at this stage in my life I have others to take care of other than myself, maybe a girlfriend, or a fiancé or a wife maybe kids the timeline of this one is foggy. My dad made it a goal to give my brother and I everything he ever wanted when he was a kid and to provide more than his parents could for him and I would also like to do the same to my loved ones. My dad did set the bar high on this one so I look forward to the challenge.

Fourth, financial freedom. There is an unbelievable amount of people in the United States that live paycheck to paycheck and I remember my parent’s doing the same at times. I don’t ever want to live a life like that.

Fifth, to help those less fortunate than me, I already practiced this when I was younger and currenly. I am aware I’ve had experiences that many have not or will not be able to have in their lives and I would like to the share that with all those that I can.

So Mr. B^2, how on earth do you plan to do all of this?

That’s a good question isn’t it, when it’s all laid out like that its hard to fathom that kind of success.

First step would be to graduate obviously, I have spent years in education and lots of money has been spent on me to get to where I am so obviously finishing what I started is a good place to begin. I would like to graduate with a 3.25 GPA currently at a 3.16 as of this semester.

Second, I would like to walk out of this university making $80,000 which I believe is a lofty but possible goal and with my skill sets, education and past experience I believe this is within my reach.

Third, using that money, and the money from my investments, and what not buy investment properties and other passive income sources. How many and of what kind I am not sure, but an investment property in my college town would be a good start I feel and from there only grow and expand my horizon as I move and travel. This could also be a side business that I develop to generate more revenue to acquire these properties and make more investments.

Fourth, rinse and repeat over and over and over again.  That in combination with my strong work ethic and developed leadership skills should put me in a position to move up the corporate ladder or start my own business or something of that sort. Not sure where I’m going but I’m going for it all.

With all of that said I would like to attain a net worth north of $3 million before I am 30 years old. I understand that is going to be extremely difficult but nothing of such high aspirations comes easy and I believe what I am doing now is laying a solid foundation for what I plan to do in the future and the fact that I already have the vision and the majority of the game plan is evident that I am already on my way.

As always let me know what you think, even if you think I am blowing smoke up my own ass I’d like to know what you think!

B^2